Archive for JC Raulston Arboretum

Raleigh area Garden Conservancy Open Days tour, also benefiting the JC Raulston Arboretum

Raleigh area Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour, also Benefiting the JC Raulston Arboretum

Saturday, September 19, 2009 from 9 – 5

Sunday, September 20, 2009 from noon – 5

Lead Garden

JCRA

4415 Beryl Road

Raleigh

RALEIGH

Rose Cottage

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Rose Cottage is an intimate city garden located in Raleigh’s downtown historic district. The gardens arose out of an old graveled parking lot. This once barren spot has been transformed into a lush and tranquil oasis of color and fragrance. It abounds with a large variety of plants. The garden setting include perennial beds, a parterre filled with a annuals, a pergola draped in wisteria, a woodland garden, raised vegetable beds, a secret garden and a compost operation. The latest addition is a garden cottage, as charming as it is useful.

Jim and Sharon Bright

115 N. Bloodworth Street

Raleigh, NC 27601

Helen’s Haven

Back Porch Labor Day 2008 054

Low Boxwood hedges are used to create a formal atmosphere to complement the formal architecture of this Georgian Colonial style home. Within these hedges are informal plantings of perennials and annuals to attract butterflies, birds and bees. Helen’s Haven is a certified wildlife habitat and a certified Monarch Watch Station. Using waterwise design principles and watered with harvested rain, this organic garden demonstrates good environmental practices resulting in a colorful, lush garden. Enjoy a leisurely stroll through the gardens watching the butterflies alight and seeing enough birds to delight.

Helen Yoest

3412 Yelverton Circle

Raleigh, NC 27612

Paisley Garden

Kornegay 019

Avid do-it-yourselfers, Julia and Alfredo’s one acre garden reflects their passion for plant collections displayed in a paisley pattern of color and whim that is still evolving. In the heart of the garden is a stone-bordered pond with a stream and waterfall. Gentle paths meander through woodlands and sunny spaces. A vine-covered arbor provides a restful sitting area. In the front garden, a new vegetable garden greets visitors. A propagation greenhouse, shed, potting bench, and compost bins are located in the garden nursery.

Julia Kornegay and Alfredo Escobar

37 Leinden Lane

Raleigh, NC 27606

CARY

The Thompson Garden

ThompsonCaryYoest

The beauty of this suburban garden begins at street side where a path beckons you to enter and share in this preview of the abundant plantings that follow. The front garden is a delight of shrubs and perennials showcasing a spectacular thread leaf Japanese maple. Upon entering the brick walkway at the arbor you view a gently sloping garden with curved borders and pathways outlined with recycled concrete. These recycled concrete borders and retaining walls are consistent throughout the garden. Beds are richly planted with perennials, featuring a mix of native and specialty plants including tropicals, all in perfect harmony. A small pond can be found along the network of twisting trails that lead through the woods to a community lake. Each area of this garden will elicit a sense of discovery and serendipity in plants, woods and water.

Kathleen and Walt Thompson

119 Ravenna Way

Cary, NC 27513

WAKE FOREST

Entwined

Wake Forest SSC 001

EntwinedV2-1

Phil Abbot & Jayme Bednarczyk

1025 Traders Trail

Wake Forest, NC 27587

Falls Revival

BottomsMartainW-FYoest 022

An historic valley provides the setting for this garden, overlooking a hillside cemetery, a quaint little church, and a cluster of old millhouses. Mature trees, remnant vineyards and orchards, heirloom shrubs, and a casual cottage style all help to anchor this garden in that nostalgic world. A backyard nursery, boasting a wide range of exotic and unusual plants, adds an unusual twist; here is a collector’s garden with traditional roots but with a fresh eye for the new and different, fending for itself against modern-day environmental pressures.

Martin and Bottoms

12150 Falls of Neuse Road

Wake Forest, NC 27587

THE GARDEN CONSERVANCY’S

OPEN DAYS PROGRAM

11 OLD POSTAL ROAD • P.O. BOX 219 • COLD SPRING, NEW YORK 10516 • 845-265-5384/5392 F

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 3, 2009

Garden Conservancy Tour Highlights Some of Raleigh Area’s Best Private Gardens

and Showcases JC Raulston Arboretum

COLD SPRING, N.Y.: The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Program returns to Raleigh, North Carolina this autumn, featuring six private gardens to visit on Saturday, September 19 (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.) and Sunday, September 20 (12 p.m. to 5 p.m.). This years’ tour also included a Cary Garden and two gardens in Wake Forest.

Gardens participating on these two dates feature European influences, gardening for nature, traditional styles, sustainable garden ideas, kitchen gardens, as well as, “Southern-style” plantings and plant collections with a nursery.

A portion of the proceeds from the weekend will benefit the JC Raulston Arboretum, a working research and teaching garden of North Carolina State University. Visitors may start their tour at the Arboretum at 4415 Beryl Road in Raleigh or go directly to the individual garden of choice. Discount tickets may be purchased in advance or entrance to the gardens can be ‘pay as you go’ with a fee of just $5.00 per garden, collected at each garden entrance.

Call 1-888-842-2442 or visit www.opendaysprogram.org for more information. For local ticket information, please contact Ann Porter JC Raulston Arboretum at Anne_Porter@ncsu.edu 1- 919-513-3826. Open Days are rain or shine and no reservations are required.

For detailed driving directions and vivid garden descriptions of the Raleigh gardens, you may refer to the 2009 Open Days Directory. The national edition includes garden listings in 23 states and costs $21.95, including shipping. Call the Garden Conservancy toll-free at 1-888-842-2442 to order with a Visa or MasterCard, or send a check or money order to: the Garden Conservancy, P.O. Box 219, Cold Spring, NY, 10516.

The 2009 Open Days Program is sponsored by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., America’s most trusted name in gardening for 125 years, providing seeds, plants, gardening supplies and accessories for the home gardener. The Open Days Program is also pleased to have Garden Design magazine as its National Media Sponsor.

The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Program has been opening the gates to America’s best private gardens since 1995. The Open Days Program is America’s only national private garden-visiting program, and is made possible by the work of hundreds of volunteers nationwide. Your $5 admission fee per garden supports the expansion of the Open Days Program around the country and helps build awareness of the Garden Conservancy’s work of preserving exceptional American gardens such as Montrose in Hillsborough, the Elizabeth Lawrence garden in Charlotte, North Carolina and Alcatraz Island, San Francisco, CA. Visit the Garden Conservancy and its Open Days Program online at http://www.opendaysprogram.org.

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J.C. Raulston Agave Blooms!

CHECK THIS OUT AGAVE FANS!

Agave Blooms

From Charlie Kidder, volunteer in the Xeric Gardens at the JC Raulston Arboretum since 2003 and is an absolute sucker for the sculptural quality of the all the agaves and their kin.  “My favorite has always been the Mescal barrel agave ‘J.C. Raulston’.  Its silvery-gray leaves are punctuated with purple-black spines and teeth, a very natty combination.  Looking straight down onto the plant–before the flower spike erupted, that is–revealed an almost hypnotic shape of interwoven triangles.

But now comes this agave’s great moment of glory, with its twelve-foot flower spike shooting up in just two months.  It’s a sight to make any guy envious!  But watch what you wish for, since flowering is the end of the agave’s life cycle.  Still, nothing like going out in style!  And even though the main agave plant will die shortly, a younger offshoot known as a “pup” will live on to beguile visitors in the future.
We generally leave agave flower stalks up even after they dry out for winter interest, but if you come out to the Arboretum soon, you can still see the dozens of yellow flowers that now top the candelabra.  You can spot it from the parking lot, against the dark green background of the holly hedge off to the south.”

From Chris Glenn, Programs and Educaiton Coordinator, JC Raulston Arboretum, “If you’ve been a Cuttings from the JCRA subscriber for a few years, you know I’m a big fan of agaves. I’ve shared their flowering here at the JCRA on a few occasions. Well, it’s that time again. Our Agave parryi subsp. parryi var. truncata ‘J.C. Raulston’ is currently in full flower. I’ve put together a photograph gallery of the plant’s flowering for you to enjoy this weekend. Better yet, come out and see it for yourself. It’s in the Xeric Garden behind the Ruby C. McSwain Education Center. Tony Avent recently named this particular plant in honor of Dr. J. C. Raulston.”

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Gala in the Garden at the JC Raulston Arboretum

What a fun way to spend a Sunday.  Add hooking up with great friends was just one of the many reasons for the fun.

roy-and-juliaRoy Dicks, author of  Rhapsody in Green and Julia Kornegay, Department Head for the Department of Horticultural Science at NC State University.  The man behind the camera was Bobby Ward, Ph.D, garden writer of many books such as  A Contemplation Upon Flowers and is currently writing the much anticipated biography on J. C. Raulston.

roy-dicks-and-helenHere is a photo of Roy and I.  I don’t look nearly as graceful as Julia.   The wind is blowing and I feel like a dressed-in-black version of the flying nun ready to take flight at any moment. Look closely, I am actually; Roy is holding me down!

We are standing in front of the trial gardens.

But look behind us.  I’m really digging the new containers at the JCRA.  Ameila organized the painting of these.  Not sure who did the design, but I’m loving them.  Maybe when I stop by the JCRA to pick up my treasures, I’ll go have a look.

Tim, I have no buyers remorse on the Japanese Maple bid, but which one was it again?  You can be so persuasive.  Consider it as trade for the ENDLESS plant ids I ask of you.

Vandi (with an “i”) just of the day, Rita, Barbara, Loren, Anne, Ed, Vernessa…I’m starting to feeling like a gossip columnists….Ruth, Gloria, Susan, Amy, Jere, Richard, Julia, Tommy, Marcy, Jan, Kathy, Mark, Mark, Mary, Amelia, Katharine, Nick, Katharine, Bobby, Roy, Julia, Viv, Chris, Denny,  Georgina, Bea, Ted, Tori, Cyndy, a covey of Worthingtons, a bunch of Blands, Judi, Ginny, and so many more.

Ok, now I am feeling like a gossip columnists.  ‘Cept, there is not gossip, only that these are just a few of the great folks at the JC Raulston Arboretum Gala in the Garden.  And it was a fun and festive day.  The decorations were enchanting, the bid items enticing.  The food by Catering Works was out of this world.  They had this cool thing – a potato bar.  Who knew?  It was yummy along with the catfish, meats, fruits, and a thing they called Southern Sushi.  Where was kk to make sure I didn’t have anything stuck in my teeth…gotta be careful with food like this!  Seasons abound and have a knack of sticking around, if you know what I mean!

It seems like everyone was there ‘cept my date, Genya.  Genya I missed you, but I understand.  Hope Deyna gets the part!

Helen and Amy

Helen and Amy

Getting Amy's Gala treasures home

Getting Amy's Gala treasures home

Thanks Susan Lamb for these last two photos.  Hey, doesn’t Amy need a Garden Coach to know where to plant her new treasures?

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Winter Interest in Helen’s Haven, plus the JCRA Winter Garden Tour and Lecture

We are so fortunate to be able to garden year-round.  I’m not just talking about being able to go outside and see green; I’m talking, flowers, fragrance, colors, and textures.

A great place to see what does well in the winter of zone 7 gardens and beyond is at the JC Raulston Arboretum in Raleigh, NC.

Each year, the JCRA holds a Winter Garden Lecture and Tour.  Here is that info below; hope to see you there!


JC Raulston Arboretum

Winter Garden Lecture and Tour

A Walk in the Winter Garden, February 15, 2009 (Sunday)

Friends of the Arboretum Lecture – 1:00 PM

“Beyond Dwarf Alberta: Conifers for Every Garden”

Mark Weathington, Assistant Director and Curator of Collections

Tours – 2:00 PM, 2:30 PM, and 3:00 PM

Free

For more information contact Chris Glenn (919) 513-7005

Chris_glenn@ncsu.edu

Helen’s Haven

Scroll down a little further and find a list of winter interest plantings found in Helen’s Haven.  I have a 4-season garden.  Much of what I learned about gardening in the winter came from my experiences with the JCRA.  As I journeyed through this garden, I took notes.  Now, years later, I have a winning winter garden, if I do say so myself.


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Helen’s Haven Winter Interest Plants

Fragrance, Flowers and Color

· Paper bush, Edgeworthia ‘Gold Rush’

· Daphne, Daphne odora ‘Variegata’

· Japanese flowering apricot, Prunus mume

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· Hardy Cyclamens, Cyclamen hederifolium and Cyclamen coum

· Early Snowdrops Galanthus woronowii

· Camellia Sasanqua flowering first then giving over to Camellia Japonica

· Forsythia first part of March

· Crocus – the Tommies comming up in the lawn

· Winter aconite, Eranthis hyemalis

· Contorted Crab Apple, Malus ‘Red Jade’

· Yellow white pine, Pinus strobes ‘Hillside Winter Gold’

· Red twig dogwood

Yellow twig dogwood

· Nandinas(domestica and threadleaf)

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· Hellebores (niger and orientalis).

· Weeping Willow with red stems, Scarlet Curls Salix matsudana ‘Scarlet Curls’

· Giant Yellow Jonquils for naturalizing (Daffodils) March 1st and even earlier in some years. February’s Gold

· Coral Bark Maple, Acer palmatum ‘Sango Kaku’

· Winterberry holly, Ilex verticillata ‘Winter Red”

Weeping Yupon Holly

· Flowering Quince, Chaenomeles speciosa

· Loropetalum Chinense ‘Pink Form’

· Blue Atlas Cedar, Cedrus atlantica ‘Pendula’

· Abelia grandiflora ‘Little Richard’ with nice red stems

· Variegated Juniper, Juniperus squamata expansa ‘Parsonii Variegata’

· Ajuga ‘Burgundy Glow’

· For color anytime GARDEN ACCENTS: Joel Haas Butterfly, gazing balls, Amelia Lane and Beth Jimenez’s red Hosta Leaf, bunnies, cats, hummingbirds, and Phil Hathcock’s Natural stone sculptures and much more.

Interesting Textures and Form

· Fig ‘Brown Turkey’

· Harry Lauder Walking stick

· herbs, esp. the Rosemary (upright and weeping),

· Santolina

· Thymes

· Parsley

· Mahonia

· Southern Magnolia. Don’t underestimate the charms of the Magnolia grandiflora. It shines in every season, but I really value it in the winter landscape.

· Cast-iron Plant, Aspidistra elatior – Nice for the evergreen color.

· Clematis Armandii – I like the leaf in any season with sensational fragrant flowers in the spring, but love the green leaves in the winter.

· Pieris japonica

· Chinese Windmill Palm, Trachycarpus fortunei. Wonderful to see covered in snow!

· Dwarf Mondo grass, Ophiopogon japonicus planted between my pavers

· Sky Pencil Holly, Ilex crenata

· Gardenia – great evergreen shrub – not used nearly enough. I think it is taken for granted and needs to be seen with new eyes.

· Oak (Georgia I think) it has a classic Oak leaf shape and keeps it leaves through the winter making a wonderful noise in the breeze.

· Bark of the Crape Myrtle, Lagerstroemia ‘Natchez’

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· Espalier Fuji apple against the house

· Climbing Hydrangea, Hydrangea anomala petiolaris against the house

· Ferns – Autumn, Dryopteris erythrosora; Holly, Polystichum falcatum; Christmas, Polystichum acrostichoides

· Fatsia japonica tropical looking evergreen shrub in a shady protected area

· Big leaf magnolia, Magnolia macrophylla – nice to see the interesting trunk in the winter

· Weeping Winged Elm, Ulmus atala with ‘wings’ on the branches very interesting bark texture for the winter garden

· Smilax is evergreen and has berries for the birds

· Japanese umbrella pine, Sciadopitys verticillata

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· Oakleaf Hydrangea, Hydrangea quercifolia

· Various Sedums

· Japanese maples, Acer palmatum ‘Bloodgood’

· Hindu-Pan Scotch Pine and Hillside Creeper Scotch Pine (Pinus sylevstris)

· Black Dragon Cryptomeria, Cryptomeria japonica ‘Black Dragon’

· Weeping Cypress, Taxodium distichum ‘Cascade Falls’

· Weeping Cherry, Prunus x ‘Snow ‘Pendula’

· Hinoki Cypress, Chamaecyparis obtuse

· Grasses – I have a very nice dwarf Pampas grass I got from the JCRA Gala held the first Sunday of May and Muhly Grass, Muhlenbergia caillaris ‘Regal Mist’

· Chocolate vine, Akebia I have mine growing in the shade, so it is very tame.

· Arum

· Aucuba japonica nice red berries and variegated leaves

· Barberry ‘Pigmy’

· Periwinkle, ’Vinca minor’

· Jasmine, confederate, star; Carolina Jessamine

· Johnny-jump-ups

· Tea Olive, Osmanthus fragrans

· Evergreen Hosta or Sacred Lily, Rhodea japonica

· Creeping raspberry, Rubus pedalobus

· Yew

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Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour, also benefiting the JC Raulston Arboretum

Raleigh area Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour, also Benefiting the JC Raulston Arboretum

Saturday, September 19, 2009 from 9 – 5

Sunday, September 20, 2009 from noon – 5

Lead Garden

JCRA

4415 Beryl Road

Raleigh

RALEIGH

Rose Cottage

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Rose Cottage is an intimate city garden located in Raleigh’s downtown historic district. The gardens arose out of an old graveled parking lot. This once barren spot has been transformed into a lush and tranquil oasis of color and fragrance. It abounds with a large variety of plants. The garden setting include perennial beds, a parterre filled with a annuals, a pergola draped in wisteria, a woodland garden, raised vegetable beds, a secret garden and a compost operation. The latest addition is a garden cottage, as charming as it is useful.

Jim and Sharon Bright

115 N. Bloodworth Street

Raleigh, NC 27601

Helen’s Haven

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Low Boxwood hedges are used to create a formal atmosphere to complement the formal architecture of this Georgian Colonial style home. Within these hedges are informal plantings of perennials and annuals to attract butterflies, birds and bees. Helen’s Haven is a certified wildlife habitat and a certified Monarch Watch Station. Using waterwise design principles and watered with harvested rain, this organic garden demonstrates good environmental practices resulting in a colorful, lush garden. Enjoy a leisurely stroll through the gardens watching the butterflies alight and seeing enough birds to delight.


Helen Yoest

3412 Yelverton Circle

Raleigh, NC 27612


Paisley Garden

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Avid do-it-yourselfers, Julia and Alfredo’s one acre garden reflects their passion for plant collections displayed in a paisley pattern of color and whim that is still evolving. In the heart of the garden is a stone-bordered pond with a stream and waterfall. Gentle paths meander through woodlands and sunny spaces. A vine-covered arbor provides a restful sitting area. In the front garden, a new vegetable garden greets visitors. A propagation greenhouse, shed, potting bench, and compost bins are located in the garden nursery.


Julia Kornegay and Alfredo Escobar

37 Leinden Lane

Raleigh, NC 27606


CARY

The Thompson Garden

thompsonfountaincaryyoest

The beauty of this suburban garden begins at street side where a path beckons you to enter and share in this preview of the abundant plantings that follow. The front garden is a delight of shrubs and perennials showcasing a spectacular thread leaf Japanese maple. Upon entering the brick walkway at the arbor you view a gently sloping garden with curved borders and pathways outlined with recycled concrete. These recycled concrete borders and retaining walls are consistent throughout the garden. Beds are richly planted with perennials, featuring a mix of native and specialty plants including tropicals, all in perfect harmony. A small pond can be found along the network of twisting trails that lead through the woods to a community lake. Each area of this garden will elicit a sense of discovery and serendipity in plants, woods and water.

Kathleen and Walt Thompson

119 Ravenna Way

Cary, NC 27513


WAKE FOREST

Entwined

bednarczyabbott-garden-photo


entwinedv2-11

Phil Abbot & Jayme Bednarczyk

1025 Traders Trail

Wake Forest, NC 27587

Falls Revival

bottomsmartainw-fyoest-0221

An historic valley provides the setting for this garden, overlooking a hillside cemetery, a quaint little church, and a cluster of old millhouses. Mature trees, remnant vineyards and orchards, heirloom shrubs, and a casual cottage style all help to anchor this garden in that nostalgic world. A backyard nursery, boasting a wide range of exotic and unusual plants, adds an unusual twist; here is a collector’s garden with traditional roots but with a fresh eye for the new and different, fending for itself against modern-day environmental pressures.


Martin and Bottoms

12150 Falls of Neuse Road

Wake Forest, NC 27587

THE GARDEN CONSERVANCY’S

OPEN DAYS PROGRAM

11 OLD POSTAL ROAD P.O. BOX 219 COLD SPRING, NEW YORK 10516 845-265-5384/5392 F

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 3, 2009

Garden Conservancy Tour Highlights Some of Raleigh Area’s Best Private Gardens

and Showcases JC Raulston Arboretum

COLD SPRING, N.Y.: The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Program returns to Raleigh, North Carolina this autumn, featuring six private gardens to visit on Saturday, September 19 (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.) and Sunday, September 20 (12 p.m. to 5 p.m.). This years’ tour also included a Cary Garden and two gardens in Wake Forest.

Gardens participating on these two dates feature European influences, gardening for nature, traditional styles, sustainable garden ideas, kitchen gardens, as well as, “Southern-style” plantings and plant collections with a nursery.

A portion of the proceeds from the weekend will benefit the JC Raulston Arboretum, a working research and teaching garden of North Carolina State University. Visitors may start their tour at the Arboretum at 4415 Beryl Road in Raleigh or go directly to the individual garden of choice. Discount tickets may be purchased in advance or entrance to the gardens can be ‘pay as you go’ with a fee of just $5.00 per garden, collected at each garden entrance.

Call 1-888-842-2442 or visit www.opendaysprogram.org for more information. For local ticket information, please contact Ann Porter JC Raulston Arboretum at Anne_Porter@ncsu.edu 1- 919-513-3826. Open Days are rain or shine and no reservations are required.

For detailed driving directions and vivid garden descriptions of the Raleigh gardens, you may refer to the 2009 Open Days Directory. The national edition includes garden listings in 23 states and costs $21.95, including shipping. Call the Garden Conservancy toll-free at 1-888-842-2442 to order with a Visa or MasterCard, or send a check or money order to: the Garden Conservancy, P.O. Box 219, Cold Spring, NY, 10516.

The 2009 Open Days Program is sponsored by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., America’s most trusted name in gardening for 125 years, providing seeds, plants, gardening supplies and accessories for the home gardener. The Open Days Program is also pleased to have Garden Design magazine as its National Media Sponsor.

The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Program has been opening the gates to America’s best private gardens since 1995. The Open Days Program is America’s only national private garden-visiting program, and is made possible by the work of hundreds of volunteers nationwide. Your $5 admission fee per garden supports the expansion of the Open Days Program around the country and helps build awareness of the Garden Conservancy’s work of preserving exceptional American gardens such as Montrose in Hillsborough, the Elizabeth Lawrence garden in Charlotte, North Carolina and Alcatraz Island, San Francisco, CA. Visit the Garden Conservancy and its Open Days Program online at http://www.opendaysprogram.org.

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Winter Interest Plants at the JC Raulston Arboretum

This sent to me from the JC Raulston Arboretum.  Even in winter our diverse plantings reward observant visitors with colorful surprises.  Here is some of what is in bloom now.

Lath House
Camellia ‘Cinnamon Cindy’ – Ackerman hybrid camellia
Camellia ×williamsii ‘Mary Christian’ – Williamsii camellia

Mixed Border
Cupressus arizonica ‘Limelight’ – yellow Arizona cypress
Hamamelis ×intermedia ‘Sunburst’ – common witchhazel
Pinus wallichiana ‘Zebrina’ – variegated Himalayan pine

Scree Garden
Iris reticulata cultivars – netted iris
Narcissus (dwarf species and cultivars)
Prunus mume ‘Omoi-no-mama’ – Japanese flowering apricot

Visitor and McSwain Education Center Gardens
Betula nigra ‘Summer Cascade’ – weeping river birch – C07
Edgeworthia chrysantha ‘Winter Gold’ – golden paperbush – C07
Picea pungens ‘Hoopsii’ – Colorado blue spruce – Su7
Salix ‘Flame’ – red-stem willow – Su7
Symphoricarpos ×doorenbosii ‘Pink Magic’ – Doorenbos coralberry – V06

Winter Garden
Cornus sanguinea ‘Midwinter Fire’ – bloodtwig dogwood
Corylus avellana ‘Contorta’ – Harry Lauder’s walking stick
Daphne odora – winter daphne
Helleborus ×hybridus and cultivars – Lenten rose
Ilex cornuta ‘Sunrise’ – golden Chinese holly
Poncirus trifoliata ‘Flying Dragon’ – contorted hardy orange
Pinus virginiana ‘Wate’s Golden’ – wintergold Virginia pine

Other Areas of the Arboretum
Acer palmatum ‘Beni kawa’ and ‘Sango kaku’ – coral-bark Japanese maple – E00, J01, and E20
Chimonanthus praecox – fragrant wintersweet – E15
Cornus mas ‘Spring Glow’ – Cornelian cherry – E16
Narcissus species and cultivars

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Preparing for the JC Raulston Arboretum Winter Walk Tour and Lecture

november-17-2008-018Volunteers are the backbone to any nonprofit arboretum, the JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University, in Raleigh, NC is no different.  There are many individuals and groups of individuals who participate in various aspects to support the JCRA; maintaining the gardens is one of them.

january-15-2009-123The Raleigh Garden Club, has maintained the Winter Garden for more than 2 years.  Last year, the RGC also added the maintenance of the Viburnum Garden.

Adrienne Jalowsky, Diane Kuzdrall, Ruth Updegraff, Helen Yoest, Vandy Bradow, Anitra Todd, Alberta McKay, Jewell Wynns, and Verna Medeiros

Left to right: Adrienne Jalowsky, Diane Kuzdrall, Ruth Updegraff, Helen Yoest, Vandy Bradow, Anitra Todd, Alberta McKay, Jewell Wynns, and Verna Medeiros

Each month, anywhere from 5 to 15 volunteers meet to prune, plant, transplant, weed, mulch,  map, and connect.  Yes, connect.  We, as individuals, are involved in other activities within the Club, but as a group, we all look forward to this time to spend together in the garden.  We discuss our gardens, especially our winter gardens, the various garden tools we prefer and why, our kids and parents.  It is so cathartic that we forget we are actually working.january-15-2009-082

This is our third January working in the Winter Garden and we are still in awe at all that grows there.  The JCRA Winter Garden is the best area example of what we can grow in our zone 7b gardens; this garden will show you and inspire you.  Each year, we are still amazed with what we see – the colors, contrasts, textures, barks, berries, foliage, cones, and FLOWERS.

january-15-2009-055Even though it was a very cold winter day, we happily met so that we could prepare the Winter Garden for the upcoming tour.  On February 15, 2009 starting at 1:00, the JCRA will host a free lecture and tour of the Winter Garden plus a plant sale.  This year’s speaker will be Mark Weathington, assistant director and curator of collections.  Mark is a fantastic speaker and this event is always well attended and anticipated.

Here is a sneak peak of some of what you would see.

Winter Garden at the JC Raulston Arboretum

Winter Garden at the JC Raulston Arboretum

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JC Raulston Arboretum

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We hope to see you at the Arb!
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