Archive for Garden Conservancy

Sightings from 2009 Raleigh Area Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Tour

Nataure's Garden 2009 Photo Shoot 205

Falls Revival

Falls Revival

Falls Revival

Falls Revival

Helen's Haven

Helen's Haven

Photo Credit Jennifer Weinberg
Photo Credit Jennifer Weinberg

Nataure's Garden 2009 Photo Shoot 109

Entwined

Entwined

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The Paisley Garden

The Paisley Garden

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The Thompson Garden

The Thompson Garden

Rose Cottage

Rose Cottage

Photo Credit Jennifer Weinberg

Photo Credit Jennifer Weinberg

Helen Yoest
Gardening With Confidence

Comments (12)

Raleigh area Garden Conservancy Open Days tour, also benefiting the JC Raulston Arboretum

Raleigh area Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour, also Benefiting the JC Raulston Arboretum

Saturday, September 19, 2009 from 9 – 5

Sunday, September 20, 2009 from noon – 5

Lead Garden

JCRA

4415 Beryl Road

Raleigh

RALEIGH

Rose Cottage

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Rose Cottage is an intimate city garden located in Raleigh’s downtown historic district. The gardens arose out of an old graveled parking lot. This once barren spot has been transformed into a lush and tranquil oasis of color and fragrance. It abounds with a large variety of plants. The garden setting include perennial beds, a parterre filled with a annuals, a pergola draped in wisteria, a woodland garden, raised vegetable beds, a secret garden and a compost operation. The latest addition is a garden cottage, as charming as it is useful.

Jim and Sharon Bright

115 N. Bloodworth Street

Raleigh, NC 27601

Helen’s Haven

Back Porch Labor Day 2008 054

Low Boxwood hedges are used to create a formal atmosphere to complement the formal architecture of this Georgian Colonial style home. Within these hedges are informal plantings of perennials and annuals to attract butterflies, birds and bees. Helen’s Haven is a certified wildlife habitat and a certified Monarch Watch Station. Using waterwise design principles and watered with harvested rain, this organic garden demonstrates good environmental practices resulting in a colorful, lush garden. Enjoy a leisurely stroll through the gardens watching the butterflies alight and seeing enough birds to delight.

Helen Yoest

3412 Yelverton Circle

Raleigh, NC 27612

Paisley Garden

Kornegay 019

Avid do-it-yourselfers, Julia and Alfredo’s one acre garden reflects their passion for plant collections displayed in a paisley pattern of color and whim that is still evolving. In the heart of the garden is a stone-bordered pond with a stream and waterfall. Gentle paths meander through woodlands and sunny spaces. A vine-covered arbor provides a restful sitting area. In the front garden, a new vegetable garden greets visitors. A propagation greenhouse, shed, potting bench, and compost bins are located in the garden nursery.

Julia Kornegay and Alfredo Escobar

37 Leinden Lane

Raleigh, NC 27606

CARY

The Thompson Garden

ThompsonCaryYoest

The beauty of this suburban garden begins at street side where a path beckons you to enter and share in this preview of the abundant plantings that follow. The front garden is a delight of shrubs and perennials showcasing a spectacular thread leaf Japanese maple. Upon entering the brick walkway at the arbor you view a gently sloping garden with curved borders and pathways outlined with recycled concrete. These recycled concrete borders and retaining walls are consistent throughout the garden. Beds are richly planted with perennials, featuring a mix of native and specialty plants including tropicals, all in perfect harmony. A small pond can be found along the network of twisting trails that lead through the woods to a community lake. Each area of this garden will elicit a sense of discovery and serendipity in plants, woods and water.

Kathleen and Walt Thompson

119 Ravenna Way

Cary, NC 27513

WAKE FOREST

Entwined

Wake Forest SSC 001

EntwinedV2-1

Phil Abbot & Jayme Bednarczyk

1025 Traders Trail

Wake Forest, NC 27587

Falls Revival

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An historic valley provides the setting for this garden, overlooking a hillside cemetery, a quaint little church, and a cluster of old millhouses. Mature trees, remnant vineyards and orchards, heirloom shrubs, and a casual cottage style all help to anchor this garden in that nostalgic world. A backyard nursery, boasting a wide range of exotic and unusual plants, adds an unusual twist; here is a collector’s garden with traditional roots but with a fresh eye for the new and different, fending for itself against modern-day environmental pressures.

Martin and Bottoms

12150 Falls of Neuse Road

Wake Forest, NC 27587

THE GARDEN CONSERVANCY’S

OPEN DAYS PROGRAM

11 OLD POSTAL ROAD • P.O. BOX 219 • COLD SPRING, NEW YORK 10516 • 845-265-5384/5392 F

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 3, 2009

Garden Conservancy Tour Highlights Some of Raleigh Area’s Best Private Gardens

and Showcases JC Raulston Arboretum

COLD SPRING, N.Y.: The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Program returns to Raleigh, North Carolina this autumn, featuring six private gardens to visit on Saturday, September 19 (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.) and Sunday, September 20 (12 p.m. to 5 p.m.). This years’ tour also included a Cary Garden and two gardens in Wake Forest.

Gardens participating on these two dates feature European influences, gardening for nature, traditional styles, sustainable garden ideas, kitchen gardens, as well as, “Southern-style” plantings and plant collections with a nursery.

A portion of the proceeds from the weekend will benefit the JC Raulston Arboretum, a working research and teaching garden of North Carolina State University. Visitors may start their tour at the Arboretum at 4415 Beryl Road in Raleigh or go directly to the individual garden of choice. Discount tickets may be purchased in advance or entrance to the gardens can be ‘pay as you go’ with a fee of just $5.00 per garden, collected at each garden entrance.

Call 1-888-842-2442 or visit www.opendaysprogram.org for more information. For local ticket information, please contact Ann Porter JC Raulston Arboretum at Anne_Porter@ncsu.edu 1- 919-513-3826. Open Days are rain or shine and no reservations are required.

For detailed driving directions and vivid garden descriptions of the Raleigh gardens, you may refer to the 2009 Open Days Directory. The national edition includes garden listings in 23 states and costs $21.95, including shipping. Call the Garden Conservancy toll-free at 1-888-842-2442 to order with a Visa or MasterCard, or send a check or money order to: the Garden Conservancy, P.O. Box 219, Cold Spring, NY, 10516.

The 2009 Open Days Program is sponsored by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., America’s most trusted name in gardening for 125 years, providing seeds, plants, gardening supplies and accessories for the home gardener. The Open Days Program is also pleased to have Garden Design magazine as its National Media Sponsor.

The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Program has been opening the gates to America’s best private gardens since 1995. The Open Days Program is America’s only national private garden-visiting program, and is made possible by the work of hundreds of volunteers nationwide. Your $5 admission fee per garden supports the expansion of the Open Days Program around the country and helps build awareness of the Garden Conservancy’s work of preserving exceptional American gardens such as Montrose in Hillsborough, the Elizabeth Lawrence garden in Charlotte, North Carolina and Alcatraz Island, San Francisco, CA. Visit the Garden Conservancy and its Open Days Program online at http://www.opendaysprogram.org.

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Comments (9)

Spring at Montrose

Montrose 002cA humble brick column with an embossed plaque reading “Montrose 320” is all that tells me I’ve arrived at Montrose.

Even passing through wrought iron gates doesn’t adequately prepare me for what lies beyond; for what I’m about to see.

Montrose is the home and garden of Nancy and Craufurd Goodwin.  Today, the gardens are open.  As a sponsored project of the Garden Conservancy, these gardens’ future are now protected, allowing them to be open “tomorrow” as well.

With an ambitious beginning in the mid 19th century, Governor William Alexander Graham and his wife, Susan Washington Graham, began a complex of gardens.  In 1977 when the Goodwin’s purchased the property, they began nurturing and expanding these gardens.

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Because of Nancy Goodwin’s tireless efforts, Montrose is now a nationally known destination garden.Montrose 005

My recent visit was a private opening to a few of Nancy’s friends.  “Just a few friends,” says Nancy. A few friends indeed!  The many guests were from the learned gardening community who has visited Montrose many times.  All of us there were admiring the work it took to accomplish what Montrose is today.  The creating of Montrose was no small feat.

You will not be disappointed taking the time to tour Montrose.  Spring is a lovely time to do so.

Guided garden tours are available by appointment on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 10:00 AM and Saturdays at either 10:00 AM or 2:00 PM.  For more information or reservations, please call 919.732.7787 between 9:00 AM and 5:00 PM.

Montrose

320 St. Mary’s Road

Hillsborough, NC

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Story and photos by
Helen Yoest
Gardening With Confidence

Comments (8)

In Print – Dr. Dennis (Denny) Werner’s garden in Nature’s Garden

Dr. Dennis (Denny) Werner, plant breeder at North Carolina State University (think ‘Blue Chip’ and ‘Miss. Ruby’) and his wife Dr. Georgina Werner’s garden on the cover and featured in Nature’s Garden, summer, 2009 issue.

You are going to LOVE this! If you garden for wildlife, want little to low maintenance, and like to see what nature returns each year, pick up a copy today.

james-baggett-photo-shoots-053

On the newsstands April 7th, Nature’s Garden features Denny and Georgina Werner’s garden. The Werner’s opened their garden in 2008 for the Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour, also benefiting the JC Raulston Arboretum.

Left to right, James Baggett, Virginia Wieler, Denny Werner

Left to right, James Baggett, Virginia Weiler, Denny Werner

In the photo is James Baggett, editor of Country Gardens Magazine, photographer Virginia Weiler and of course, Denny. (Y’all, remember how much fun this was?) I’m the one taking the photograph and the story’s producer.

I believe we all look like our gardens; this garden looks just like Denny – BEAUTIFUL!

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P.S. Check out Nature’s Garden and Country Garden’s blogs

Nature’s Garden Magazine Blog – Jane McKeon

Country Gardener – James Baggett – Country Gardens Magazine

Helen Yoest

Gardening With Confidence

Comments (5)

A visit to Pearl Fryer’s garden

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April last year, I stopped to visit Pearl Fryer’s topiary garden.  I have been an admirer for a very long time.  As a volunteer regional representative for the Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour, it did me proud when Pearl’s garden came under their protection.

It was a cold misty day when I visited April, 2008.  I plan to go again.   One night, a while back, the kids and I watched the documentary on Pearl.  They, as was I, were wowed by the man and the garden.  They want to see this garden.  It’s in a neighborhood where one might otherwise feel like an intruder – sweet, quiet, quaint.  But it’s OK, Pearl and the neighbors are use to the traffic.  Even when I visited, on a cold and misty day with no one in sight, the garden was welcoming.

Here’s an expert from my journal…

By the sweet smell of wood smoke coming from his chimney, I assumed Pearl Fryer was home – inside warm, dry, and cozy – outside 50, drizzling, and gray. Yet the sculpted gardens were bright and cheerful. I finally had peralbishopsvilleyoest-14the chance to visit the amazing topiary gardens of Pearl’s dreams. I’m glad I did. Located in Bishopville, SC, this garden is now being preserved by the Garden Conservancy.

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Comments (24)

Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour, also benefiting the JC Raulston Arboretum

Raleigh area Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour, also Benefiting the JC Raulston Arboretum

Saturday, September 19, 2009 from 9 – 5

Sunday, September 20, 2009 from noon – 5

Lead Garden

JCRA

4415 Beryl Road

Raleigh

RALEIGH

Rose Cottage

brightsraleighyoest-121

Rose Cottage is an intimate city garden located in Raleigh’s downtown historic district. The gardens arose out of an old graveled parking lot. This once barren spot has been transformed into a lush and tranquil oasis of color and fragrance. It abounds with a large variety of plants. The garden setting include perennial beds, a parterre filled with a annuals, a pergola draped in wisteria, a woodland garden, raised vegetable beds, a secret garden and a compost operation. The latest addition is a garden cottage, as charming as it is useful.

Jim and Sharon Bright

115 N. Bloodworth Street

Raleigh, NC 27601

Helen’s Haven

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Low Boxwood hedges are used to create a formal atmosphere to complement the formal architecture of this Georgian Colonial style home. Within these hedges are informal plantings of perennials and annuals to attract butterflies, birds and bees. Helen’s Haven is a certified wildlife habitat and a certified Monarch Watch Station. Using waterwise design principles and watered with harvested rain, this organic garden demonstrates good environmental practices resulting in a colorful, lush garden. Enjoy a leisurely stroll through the gardens watching the butterflies alight and seeing enough birds to delight.


Helen Yoest

3412 Yelverton Circle

Raleigh, NC 27612


Paisley Garden

home-images-038

Avid do-it-yourselfers, Julia and Alfredo’s one acre garden reflects their passion for plant collections displayed in a paisley pattern of color and whim that is still evolving. In the heart of the garden is a stone-bordered pond with a stream and waterfall. Gentle paths meander through woodlands and sunny spaces. A vine-covered arbor provides a restful sitting area. In the front garden, a new vegetable garden greets visitors. A propagation greenhouse, shed, potting bench, and compost bins are located in the garden nursery.


Julia Kornegay and Alfredo Escobar

37 Leinden Lane

Raleigh, NC 27606


CARY

The Thompson Garden

thompsonfountaincaryyoest

The beauty of this suburban garden begins at street side where a path beckons you to enter and share in this preview of the abundant plantings that follow. The front garden is a delight of shrubs and perennials showcasing a spectacular thread leaf Japanese maple. Upon entering the brick walkway at the arbor you view a gently sloping garden with curved borders and pathways outlined with recycled concrete. These recycled concrete borders and retaining walls are consistent throughout the garden. Beds are richly planted with perennials, featuring a mix of native and specialty plants including tropicals, all in perfect harmony. A small pond can be found along the network of twisting trails that lead through the woods to a community lake. Each area of this garden will elicit a sense of discovery and serendipity in plants, woods and water.

Kathleen and Walt Thompson

119 Ravenna Way

Cary, NC 27513


WAKE FOREST

Entwined

bednarczyabbott-garden-photo


entwinedv2-11

Phil Abbot & Jayme Bednarczyk

1025 Traders Trail

Wake Forest, NC 27587

Falls Revival

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An historic valley provides the setting for this garden, overlooking a hillside cemetery, a quaint little church, and a cluster of old millhouses. Mature trees, remnant vineyards and orchards, heirloom shrubs, and a casual cottage style all help to anchor this garden in that nostalgic world. A backyard nursery, boasting a wide range of exotic and unusual plants, adds an unusual twist; here is a collector’s garden with traditional roots but with a fresh eye for the new and different, fending for itself against modern-day environmental pressures.


Martin and Bottoms

12150 Falls of Neuse Road

Wake Forest, NC 27587

THE GARDEN CONSERVANCY’S

OPEN DAYS PROGRAM

11 OLD POSTAL ROAD P.O. BOX 219 COLD SPRING, NEW YORK 10516 845-265-5384/5392 F

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 3, 2009

Garden Conservancy Tour Highlights Some of Raleigh Area’s Best Private Gardens

and Showcases JC Raulston Arboretum

COLD SPRING, N.Y.: The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Program returns to Raleigh, North Carolina this autumn, featuring six private gardens to visit on Saturday, September 19 (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.) and Sunday, September 20 (12 p.m. to 5 p.m.). This years’ tour also included a Cary Garden and two gardens in Wake Forest.

Gardens participating on these two dates feature European influences, gardening for nature, traditional styles, sustainable garden ideas, kitchen gardens, as well as, “Southern-style” plantings and plant collections with a nursery.

A portion of the proceeds from the weekend will benefit the JC Raulston Arboretum, a working research and teaching garden of North Carolina State University. Visitors may start their tour at the Arboretum at 4415 Beryl Road in Raleigh or go directly to the individual garden of choice. Discount tickets may be purchased in advance or entrance to the gardens can be ‘pay as you go’ with a fee of just $5.00 per garden, collected at each garden entrance.

Call 1-888-842-2442 or visit www.opendaysprogram.org for more information. For local ticket information, please contact Ann Porter JC Raulston Arboretum at Anne_Porter@ncsu.edu 1- 919-513-3826. Open Days are rain or shine and no reservations are required.

For detailed driving directions and vivid garden descriptions of the Raleigh gardens, you may refer to the 2009 Open Days Directory. The national edition includes garden listings in 23 states and costs $21.95, including shipping. Call the Garden Conservancy toll-free at 1-888-842-2442 to order with a Visa or MasterCard, or send a check or money order to: the Garden Conservancy, P.O. Box 219, Cold Spring, NY, 10516.

The 2009 Open Days Program is sponsored by W. Atlee Burpee & Co., America’s most trusted name in gardening for 125 years, providing seeds, plants, gardening supplies and accessories for the home gardener. The Open Days Program is also pleased to have Garden Design magazine as its National Media Sponsor.

The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Program has been opening the gates to America’s best private gardens since 1995. The Open Days Program is America’s only national private garden-visiting program, and is made possible by the work of hundreds of volunteers nationwide. Your $5 admission fee per garden supports the expansion of the Open Days Program around the country and helps build awareness of the Garden Conservancy’s work of preserving exceptional American gardens such as Montrose in Hillsborough, the Elizabeth Lawrence garden in Charlotte, North Carolina and Alcatraz Island, San Francisco, CA. Visit the Garden Conservancy and its Open Days Program online at http://www.opendaysprogram.org.

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Comments (18)

Wednesday, September 24, 2008 Raleigh Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour also benefiting the JC Raulston Arboretum

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

The results are in…another great year for the Raleigh and beyond Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour also benefiting the JC Raulston Arboretum. We had great weather and great gardens…the perfect combination. But we also had 2 noon games – one at State and the other at UNC. What sport is it this time of year? I can never remember nor do I care – ‘cept for the fact that it competes with my tour and generally getting people excited about being outside in the garden.

Mark your calendars for September 19/20, 2009. We have a great line up. As much as I bash sporting events, save gardening, I somehow fall back on sporting clichés to describe a situation…go figure.  6 Great gardens have agreed to open.  2 in Wake Forest, 2 inside the Beltline Raleigh, and 2 in Cary!  More coming.

Peggy Walters, landscape photographer will be taking media shots of the gardens. We will post them to whet your appetite.

Helen Yoest (Philbrook)

Comments (2)

Tuesday, July 22, 2008 Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour, also benefiting the JCRA

This is the time of year I hit high gear planning for the Garden Conservancy’s Open day tour also benefiting the JCRA – for next year.  It’s kind of crazy now because the current years promotion is gearing up, but I need to also focus on next years’ tour.

The 2008 tour is a very nice set of six gardens to visit.

The Stevens’ Garden, 132 Lochwood West Drive, Cary

This magnificent garden is nestled among native trees and backs up to lovely Lake Lochmere. The sloped front lawn draws you into a formal symmetrical brick courtyard perfumed with roses and clematis. Pruned boxwoods, topiaries and teak benches lend an English touch. Follow the wide brick paths past a mighty Beech tree and soothing water feature to an inviting lakeside gazebo then on to the dock where white swan and abundant fish abound. A smooth, green expanse of lawn complements the colorful backyard garden beds full of perennials and flowering shrubs. An expansive lakeside viewing deck provides a welcome opportunity to pause and survey the entire garden vista.  

Judy and Frank Harmon Residence, 114 Brooks Ave, Raleigh

Residence Our compact house and garden were designed to allow as much sunlight in, while offering a view and privacy within a busy university neighborhood.  The total “home” is half house, half garden; the exterior is as much a part of our living experience as the interior.

Determined to preserve four large oaks and two large mulberry trees along the perimeter of the one-third-acre corner lot, the house is built on 14 concrete piers. To give the house a sense of both strength and lightness, steel was used for the structure. 

The garden walls are covered in vines resulting in secluded gardens within the walls – continuous, curvilinear gardens that combine sunny, open spaces with lush areas of dense foliage. The gardens, carefully planted to offer something to see and enjoy year-round, create a rhythm of activity and repose, of light and dark. 

The Harris Garden, 4352 Blossom Hill Ct., Raleigh

Gently curving and shaded walkways lead our visitors to a variety of private and restful retreats throughout the garden.  Designed and developed by Karen and Ted Harris over the last 16 years, this 2.3-acre informal and serene garden features a natural stream and two stocked ponds that are adorned by water lilies, irises, and rush.  The connecting paths are draped by mature trees intermingled with evergreens, Japanese maples, oak leaf hydrangeas, native magnolias and a variety of ferns. The relaxing sound of a waterfall and presence of abundant wildlife beacons one to sit and stay awhile. 

The Shuping Garden, 2441 West Lake Drive, Raleigh

As your journey begins through the front natural are, the classic Georgian manor emerges through redbuds, dogwoods, and stately magnolias.  After a visit to the cistern in the gated courtyard, stroll to the piazza and quatrefoil fountain on the ground’s lower level.  The cloud-pruned Boulevard Cypress flanking the steps entering the upper level is always a crowd pleaser.  You will find an array of unique treasures as you explore the three acres of garden rooms.

Titus Garden, 10101 Roadstead Way East, Raleigh

The walled garden of this shady quarter-acre lot is a sanctuary of calmness and lushness.  Many features anchor this garden connected with stone and gravel paths.  Down the paths you will find stone-faced spill ponds including a large pond with a three-tier waterfall containing around 300 colorful fish. 

One part of the garden is anchored with an octagon shaped gazebo raised on stilts giving the feeling of being in another world.  Another part of the garden features a large vine-covered pergola with a crystal chandelier and dining seating for 12.  Garden plantings include some 300 specimens of mature trees, shrubs, perennials, hostas, fern and more; giving this garden a feeling of being in the Far East.

Dennis & Georginia Werner, 5901 Fordland Drive, Raleigh

An informal collector’s garden featuring a 2,800 sq. ft herbaceous perennial border, colorful annual plantings surrounding an in-ground pool, a gazebo surrounded by a large planting of herbaceous perennials and shrubs, natural areas with mixed shrub and tree plantings, and foundation plantings featuring a diversity of small trees, shrubs, herbaceous perennials, and ferns. 

Tour days and times are:  Saturday, September 20: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, September 21: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.  For more information and descriptons of the gardens, please visit www.opendaysprogram.org

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Sunday, April 6, 2008 Pearl Fryer

By the sweet smell of wood smoke coming from his chimney, I assumed Pearl Fryer was home – inside warm, dry, and cozy – outside 50, drizzling, and gray. Yet the sculpted gardens were bright and cheerful. I finally had peralbishopsvilleyoest-14the chance to visit the amazing topiary gardens of Pearl’s dreams. I’m glad I did. Located in Bishopville, SC, this garden is now being preserved by the Garden Conservancy.

peralbishopsvilleyoest-30

We had a good 2.5 inches of rain this week. After checking out http://www.wral.com, and a lead story entitled Falls Lake Finally Full, I see, as of this morning, Falls Lake, Raleigh’s major water source, is at 252 feet. The lake is considered full at 251.5 feet.

City Council ruled that when we got at 90% capacity, we should be able to go back to Stage 1 watering restrictions. As promised, this begins on Tuesday. Unfortunately, Stage 1 also means lawns can be watered once a week. Of course, the irony is the grass doesn’t need watering because we have received enough to green it up nicely. This also means we will be able to water from the end of the hose twice a week. It is my hope, however, not to have to do so.

My friend Bill found me 250 gallon water container. This will become my main rain catch basin. From here, I will transfer water to various parts of the garden and use only when plants need watering – new plantings, those not yet established, those in the oasis zone and finally, those in the transitional zone in the absence of long periods of rain will benefit from this stored water.

Due to the recent rain, gardeners are shopping for spring flowers. I hope they do plant, but plant waterwisely…put the right plant in the right place, take time to properly prepare the soil, and only water when needed.

We had roller coaster weather this week – cold, then mild, windy, then cold, then hot and ending on a cold note.

The garden looks fantastic. Blooming on April 1 was verbena ‘Homestead Purple’, contorted crabapple , daffs, Brunnera macrophylla ‘Jack Frost’, Hellebores, Redbud (waning), Carolina Jessamine, pansies, Ajuga ‘Chocolate Chip’, Iris, columbine, Mrs. G.G. Gerbing azalea, Loropetalum (Sp.?), spirea (Sp.?), Rosemary, Spanish Lavender, Vinca, Camellias (still!), Chrysogonum virginianum green and gold ‘Allen Bush’, tulips, veronica ‘Georgia’, quince (Sp.?), Dogwood (Sp.?), Cross vine (just starting), Forsythia (Sp.?),

I took a couple days off to attend the Carolina Garden Magazine 11th annual garden tour. This year the tour was in Charleston. I had sensory overload. Good thing I have photographs to refer back too so I can further study all that I saw.

The biggest surprise in my garden when I returned from Charleston was the smoke bush (Cotinus Royal Purple) leafing out. I planted her in the midst of the heat and drought (but, post Easter freeze) and it did not do well. We couldn’t water and she lost her leaves. I thought it went to the big compost heap in the sky. During last year’s tough summer and fall, I followed the advice of Mark Weathington at the JC Raulston Arboretum with regards to maintaining our assigned collections. We were to treat any dead looking plant as viable. We did there and I followed this advice in my own garden ‘Helen’s Haven’…I am glad I did.

Helen Yoest (Philbrook)

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