Archive for Garden Mission Statements

Collective Garden Mission Statements – for the love of your garden

Collective Garden Mission Statements

From around the world!

Are you Grounded in your Garden?

How was it possible one simple challenge could spark so much thought?  I can only surmise it’s because gardeners are a passionate people.  We live, dream, enjoy, and delight in our gardens.

Here is the original post to refresh your memory or to get you up to speed Garden Mission Statement

Below are some of the missions statements I’m aware of.  Many other bloggers wrote about their process with many of their readers responding directly to them.

If you read this and want me to add yours to this growing list, please leave a comment.  Also if you have written the process – the journey that led to your creating your garden’s  mission statement, link that as well.

The passion we gardeners have for our gardens is awe inspiring.  Enjoy!

Helen Yoest’s garden, Helen’s Haven, Raleigh, North Carolina, Zone 7b
Gardening With Confidence
Helen’s Haven is a sustainable, wildlife habitat, created to attract and feed birds, bees, butterflies and for the enjoyment of friends, family, and visitors to educate, enjoy, and to understand we are the earth’s caretakers, so let’s take care.

Kathy Purdy’ garden, NY, Zone 4 – length of growing season; 5 winter
Cold Climate Gardening
Pending

The Putz at Copper Top, North Carolina, Zone 7
Flower Garden Girl
The Putz at Copper Top:  Decorating A Garden so it brings joy to all who enter.

Arcadia1, Washington, Zone 8
Personal Garden Coach
Arcadia:  The place where the garden of fantasy in my minds eyes meets the reality that I try to create every season

Grumpy’s Inferno, Alabama, Zone 7b
Grumpy Gardener – Southern Living Magazine
The mission of this garden shall be to make the neighbors feel ignorant and inadequate, while requiring only marginal inputs of labor.

May Dreams Gardens,  Zone 5
May Dreams Gardens
To sow, grow, and sustain good things in life’s garden

Tiger, Zone 6/7 On the line & I push it each day
In The Garden
Tiger garden’s mission is to be a cohesive, sustainable community of living and non-living elements working together in harmony to provide the best possible living area and enjoyment for its residents.

Sheryl’s Kitchen Garden, Oregon, Zone 6
Sheryl’s Kitchen Garden
Sheryl’s Kitchen Garden is both gift and giver.

Middleground, Colorado, Zone5
EsmaaSelf
Middleground is a safe haven, a place to be nourished and replenished; a property open to all life; a year-round organic gardening experiment run by an adventurous chef intent on improving the health of the planet, one bite at a time.

The Hooshel Garden, Montana, Zone 3
Living in Season
The Hooshel Garden is a bountiful example of how successes and failures are all part of the learning process, a relaxed environment where food and advice are plentiful, and a hands-on project where the next generation learns to love every aspect of it.

Soekershof Botanical Garden, South Africa
Soekershof, Private Mazes & Botanical Gardens
Soekershof is a sacred enterprise, based on the appreciation of nature, humor, play, creation, expression and respect for the land and the growth and development of the people and plants that participate.

Garden Porn
Garden Porn
If one cannot afford to travel to Hawaii, then create it in your own backyard.

Wolf Dancer Creek Farm ~ The Winsome Winged Gardens
Wold Dancer Creek Farm
Wolfdancer Creek is a sustainable wildlife habitat, and a working Farm, created and rehabilitated to attract and feed our fellow Travelers on this Earth Walk and for the enjoyment of friends, family, and visitors to educate, to enjoy, to dream awhile, and to understand we are the earth’s caretakers, so let’s take care.

Veg Plotting
Veg Plotting
My garden:  ever changing, always learning.

The Garden, Zone 5
Bloomin’ Blogger
Emphasize plants that will attract winged creatures to the garden, and to take the time to pause and enjoy watching them.

Ilona’s garden, Zone 5a
Ilona’s Garden
Welcome life, host peacefully & kindly, provide abundantly.

kk’s garden, My Garden,  Zone 8

The goal of My Garden is to provide a creative outlet for me while challenging my design and horticultural skills, by creating pleasing plant combinations and arrangements that showcase the seasonality of the garden. I strive for the garden to be wildlife and pet friendly. Plant selection and design of spaces endeavor to punctuate the senses and calm the soul. The intent of My Garden is to act as an extension of the house to facilitate outdoor living while providing privacy from the neighbors, yet evoking a sense of enclosure. I look to My Garden to supply seasonal fresh cut flowers and fresh picked vegetables. It is my hope to project a sense of place; home.

Carol Stein’s garden, Home, Zone 7

Your mission is to provide comfort, joy, food, water and shelter for all creatures who venture into your realm. You are a sanctuary of carefully chosen, organically sustained, drought-tolerant and disease resistant plants. Within your boundaries, birds, reptiles and amphibians are in charge of bug control, mammals that wander in may do so unmolested, and human guests will enjoy an atmosphere approximating life.

Phil Abbot and Jayme Bednarczyk’s garden, Entwined, Zone 7

Hopeful dreams entwined with patience and time,

Cherry trees bloom amidst whispering pines.

A hand built home grew among fruitful trees,

Passive solar sited to capture the breeze.

Upon stone walls climbing Roses scramble

Interlaced Clematis delight and ramble.

A south facing room in need of a view,

To embrace the sunlight – geothermal too.

After clearing some pines, light and energy found

Now a beautiful lake where habitat abounds

Entwined gardens with curvilinear walls

Terraced and planted, space to gather for all

Plants for food, plants for shelter

Plants for fragrance, interwoven color with texture.

Pathways meander, through a garden of splendor

Hearts and souls, are nourished and remember.

Villa and garden – with European appeal

Hand built passion entwined – the dream revealed.

Garden Fare, CA
Garden Fare
Mission Statement:Our mission is to create home-scale gardens that provide peace of mind and nutritious food for our community. We design these gardens to be visually interesting, produce abundant fruits and vegetables, and be ecologically sustainable

Susan Cohan, Zone 6
Miss Rumphius’ Rules
My personal garden is an imperfect place of free experimentation for design ideas and sustainable practices. It is a space in a state of constant change—through my own hand, the growth of plants and the seasons.

Sally Rogue Valley of southern Oregon, Zone 7
An Electric Garden
My garden will be a place of peace and abundance for the body, mind and spirit. It will welcome, nourish, teach and soothe. It will serve to honor its part in the harmony, in the dance, and in the continuity of our earth.

Comments (14)

A garden mission statement or Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Tour copy – both, actually!

My friends Jayme Bednarczyk and her husband Phil Abbot will open their garden for the Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour, also benefiting the JC Raulston Arboretum, September 19 & 20, 2009.

Ever having several pokers in the fire, I was working on the press releases for the 2009 Raleigh area Garden Conservancy tour while collecting garden missions statements from around the world.   Part of the process of being accepted for the Garden Conservancy tour, an application is filled out.  Included in the application is a short write-up about the garden.  This write-up is what appears in the National Garden Conservancy publication.

Typically, the write-ups are concise, informative, and practical.  When I read Phil and Jayme’s I couldn’t remember what I was working on – was I looking at Garden Conservancy copy or did Jayme send me a mission statement?  What I found was their Garden Conservancy write-up could be both.

I immediately contacted Jayme to see if they would let me use their Garden Conservancy write-up in my collection of mission statement. They agreed.

Jayme and Phil’s mission statement is the exception with regards to the prose.  Everyone’s I have received, has been heartfelt and passionate.  Anyone who cares for their piece of earth qualifies – an acre or a window box, it’s the care that counts.

If you are so inclined, please send me your mission statement. I will post on Valentines Day – for the love of your garden.

entwinedv2-1

Comments (6)

In Print – More gardeners write their garden mission statement

Local garden writer for the News and Observer, Carol Stein, in her column The Grapevine, takes the challenge to write her garden mission statement.

This challenge was first published on my blog, December 31, 2008.  My site has received many thousands of hits and dozens of other bloggers wrote their perspective of the challenge and ultimately, many wrote a mission statement for their garden.

Chick here to read Carol’s column http://tinyurl.com/bjrv4s

My mission statement is below.  On February 14th, Valentine’s Day, I plan to post the mission statements sent to me.  Why Valentine’s Day?  For the garden love in our lives.

If you write or plan to write your garden mission statement, please let me know; I will post collection of February 14, 2009 Please include your Zone.  My garden mission statement is at the end.

While I enjoyed every mission statement sent in, it was the journey expressed by the gardener that gave me the greatest joy.  Carol’s column is one great example.  I see a book in my future.  The gardens, the journey, the statements.  Remember, there is no pressure.  Just speak from your heart – it’s about the journey you are taking with your garden.  Nothing more, nothing less.


image007

Most gardens start out innocently enough, and I’ll venture to say, never with the intent to having a garden worthy of naming. But then, till by till, amendment by amendment, hole by hole, plant by plant, mulch by mulch, raindrop by raindrop, we have created a mix, a garden, that is as unique as a snowflake.  We look at our gardens with admiration, even when its an adolescence, not quite ready for the world, but with so much hope and promise.  Only the caregiver can see it fully grown and ready to face the world.

After putting in so much time, effort, money, and love into a project, it becomes apart of you, it’s only natural to think of your garden in  affectionate terms.  Naming the garden also allows some reflection of you as to how you want your garden represented to others.

Without a name for our gardens, and later a mission statement, we grapple for words to describe it to others.  Taking a moment to identify your garden to yourself helps express it to others in an affectionate way, without being boastful, or worse, which is how I hear it most, in a not-so-worthy-way – especially when it is.

For the new year, I suggest you give your garden some deep labor-day-2008-054thought.  By doing so, you help to, not only identify yourself in relation to your garden, but elevate your garden’s status by naming it and then to concisely describing it by giving it a mission statement.  Next time someone asks you to describe your garden, you can do so in a very concise manner.

2008-may-4-0331It’s liberating, actually.  Try it; you’ll see.

Whether you name the garden first and the write your mission statement next or the other way around, it doesn’t matter.  Reflect on how you want others to view your garden.  Free yourself of an identity crisis.

philbrookraleighyoest-44For my garden in Raleigh, North Carolina, Helen’s Haven, I don’t remember which came first, my garden’s name or mission statement.  What I do know is, one day I wrote the merits of my garden.  From there came the name, Helen’s Haven, and the mission statement.

Helen’s Haven, a garden for everyone

And for one’s own

Helen’s Haven was designed to be sustainable and a safe haven for the three B’s: birds, bees, butterflies and of course humans, especially kids.

A Purposeful Garden

philbrookraleighyoest-36My garden, Helen’s Haven, was designed as a place to admire the three B’s and a place where children can stop their play to taste a fig ripened on the shrub; pop a cherry tomato in their mouth warmed from the sun, fresh from the vine, and of course, to stop to smell the roses. While Helen’s Haven is a tidy garden, it isn’t fussy. An errant ball in the borders is nothing to worry about, nor are kids cutting through the beds, rolling in the grass, or picking flowers for an impromptu arrangement or to spread petals along the driveway and paths.

A Wildlife Garden

Helen’s Haven is a certified wildlife garden by the National Wildlife Federation and a certified Monarch Waystation.

larvaeraleighyoest-4Plants are selected to attract and feed the birds, bees, and butterflies. This garden also provides feeding stations, nesting boxes and water. Many bees are attracted as pollinators, as well as, honey makers. For the butterflies, Helen’s Haven provides a dedicated host and nectar gardens filled with specific plants for the butterflies to lay their eggs, to feed larvae, to provide shelter to form chrysalis and to sip nectar as an adult.

An Organic Garden

An organic garden, Helen’s Haven uses no chemical herbicides, pesticides, or fungicides. If needed, only organic products are used.

Composed leaf mulch is used generously, retaining water, maintaining a consistent root temperature, improving soil texture, suppressing weeds, and looks great. In fact, very little weeding is necessary in Helen’s Haven. This mulch is replenished on a grand scale annually in the winter and on an as needed basis throughout the year in areas disturbed from adding new plantings and such.

A Waterwise Garden

A waterwise design, Helen’s Haven uses only harvested rainwater collected and stored in two 250 gallon reservoirs and four 80 gallon satellite storage units. With three zones, oasis, transitional and xeric, plants are chosen to flourish in each respective zone. There are also xeric plants in oasis zones and vice versa; however, no special treatment is given to these plants. If, in a given year, nature cares for them, that’s fine, if not, that’s fine as well.july-19-2008-004

The sign on the mail box reads “A Waterwise Garden, Watered with Harvested Rain.” The tall fescue grass is allowed to go dormant during the absence of rain – affectionally known as going “Dormant for the Moment.”

Sharing Helen’s Haven with Others

Helen’s Haven opens to garden clubs, schools and other educational groups and for the Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour. Helen’s Haven is considered a four season garden, with the best showing in summer, fall, and winter.philbrookraleighyoest-47

Giving Back

Helen serves on the JC Raulston Arboretum Board of Advisors, represents the Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour, leads the volunteer committees to maintain the JCRA Viburnum, Winter, and Butterfly gardens. Helen also serves on other committees to raise money for horticultural interest, including conceiving and starting the annual Sensational Seasonal Celebrations parties across the state to benefit the JCRA.

GARDEN MISSION STATEMENT

Helen’s Haven is a sustainable, wildlife habitat, created to attract and feed birds, bees, butterflies and for the enjoyment of friends, family, and visitors to educate, enjoy, and to understand we are the earth’s caretakers, so let’s take care.

philbrookraleighyoest-8

Comments (9)

Writing a garden’s mission statement and creating a garden name

If you write or plan to write your garden mission statement, please let me know; I plan to post the collection. Please include your Zone.  My garden mission statement is at the end.


image007

Most gardens start out innocently enough, and I’ll venture to say, never with the intent to having a garden worthy of naming. But then, till by till, hole by hole, plant by plant, raindrop by raindrop, we have created a mix, a garden, that is as unique as a snowflake.  We look at our gardens with admiration, even when its an adolescence, not quite ready for the world, but with so much hope and promise.  Only the caregiver can see it fully grown and ready to face the world.

After putting in so much time, effort, money, and love into a project, it becomes apart of you, it’s only natural to think of your garden in  affectionate terms.  Naming the garden also allows some reflection of you as to how you want your garden represented to others.

Without a name for your garden, and later a mission statement, we grapple for words to describe it to others.  Taking a moment to identify your garden to yourself helps express it to others in an affectionate way, without being boastful, or worse, which is how I hear it most, in a not-so-worthy-way – especially when it is.

For the new year, I suggest you give your garden some deep labor-day-2008-054thought.  By doing so, you help to, not only identify yourself in relation to your garden, but elevate your garden’s status by naming it and then to concisely describing it by giving it a mission statement.  Next time someone asks you to describe your garden, you can do so in a very concise manner.

2008-may-4-0331It’s liberating, actually.  Try it; you’ll see.

Whether you name the garden first and then write your mission statement next or the other way around, it doesn’t matter.  Reflect on how you want others to view your garden.  Free yourself of an identity crisis.

philbrookraleighyoest-44For my garden in Raleigh, North Carolina, Helen’s Haven, I don’t remember which came first, my garden’s name or mission statement.  What I do know is, one day I wrote the merits of my garden.  From there came the name, Helen’s Haven, and the mission statement.

Helen’s Haven, a garden for everyone

And for one’s own

Helen’s Haven was designed to be sustainable and a safe haven for the three B’s: birds, bees, butterflies and of course humans, especially kids.

A Purposeful Garden

philbrookraleighyoest-36Helen’s Haven, was designed as a place to admire wildlife and a place where children can stop their play to taste a fig ripened on the shrub; pop a cherry tomato in their mouth warmed from the sun, fresh from the vine, and of course, to stop to smell the roses. While Helen’s Haven is a tidy garden, it isn’t fussy. An errant ball in the borders is nothing to worry about, nor are kids cutting through the beds, rolling in the grass, or picking flowers for an impromptu arrangement or to spread petals along the driveway and paths.  It was designed with my kids in mind.

A Wildlife Garden

Helen’s Haven is a certified wildlife garden by the National Wildlife Federation and a certified Monarch Waystation.

larvaeraleighyoest-4Plants are selected to attract and feed the birds, bees, and butterflies. This garden also provides feeding stations, nesting boxes and water. Many bees are attracted as pollinators, as well as, honey makers. For the butterflies, Helen’s Haven provides a dedicated host and nectar gardens filled with specific plants for the butterflies to lay their eggs, to feed larvae, to provide shelter to form chrysalis and to sip nectar as an adult.

An Organic Garden

An organic garden, Helen’s Haven uses no chemical herbicides, pesticides, or fungicides. If needed, only organic products are used.

Composed leaf mulch is used generously, retaining water, maintaining a consistent root temperature, improving soil texture, suppressing weeds, and looks great. In fact, very little weeding is necessary in Helen’s Haven. This mulch is replenished on a grand scale annually in the winter and on an as needed basis throughout the year in areas disturbed from adding new plantings and such.

A Waterwise Garden

A waterwise design, Helen’s Haven uses only harvested rainwater collected and stored in two 250 gallon reservoirs and four 80 gallon satellite storage units. With three zones, oasis, transitional and xeric, plants are chosen to flourish in each respective zone. There are also xeric plants in oasis zones and vice versa; however, no special treatment is given to these plants. If, in a given year, nature cares for them, that’s fine, if not, that’s fine as well.july-19-2008-004

The sign on the mail box reads “A Waterwise Garden, Watered with Harvested Rain.” The tall fescue grass is allowed to go dormant during the absence of rain – affectionally known as going “Dormant for the Moment.”

Sharing Helen’s Haven with Others

Helen’s Haven opens to garden clubs, schools and other educational groups and for the Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour. philbrookraleighyoest-47

Giving Back

Helen serves on the JC Raulston Arboretum Board of Advisors, represents the Garden Conservancy’s Open Days tour, leads the volunteer committees to maintain the JCRA Viburnum, Winter, and Butterfly gardens. Helen also serves on other committees to raise money for horticultural interest, including conceiving and starting the annual Sensational Seasonal Celebrations parties across the state to benefit the JCRA.

GARDEN MISSION STATEMENT

Helen’s Haven is a sustainable, wildlife habitat, created to attract and feed birds, bees, butterflies and for the enjoyment of friends, family, and visitors to educate, enjoy, and to understand we are the earth’s caretakers, so let’s take care.

philbrookraleighyoest-8

Comments (53)

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